Deindustrialization and the Materialities of Labour – Part I – Discussion Recordings

Enjoy highlights and listen to ambient recordings from Part I of Telematic Cafe labour-themed discussions! As announced before – this Telematic Cafe event was inspired by VACANTGeelong Project.

Telematic Cafe is thankful to the VACANTGeelong Project organisers, especially, Mirjana Lozanovska and Cameron Bishop of Deakin University for collaboration with Telematic Cafe during Open Studio Day, 24 May 2017. Telematic Cafe would like to extend special thanks to Ian Priddle from Codeacious for responsiveness and time!

The “Labour of Making” discussion focused on the significance of manual, constructive and creative production. Discussion partners: VACANTGeelong project artist Robert Mihajlovski (RM) and architect & Senior Lecturer of the School of Architecture and Built Environment at Deakin University Dr David Beynon (DB). Moderator: Telematic Cafe curator Marita Batna.

DB: There are similarities between drawing by hand and drawing with a mouse or trackpad. But there is also a difference. There is some kind of distance between you and the object… maybe because you can’t actually touch it. Your hands have been away from it… [physical object] appears through some kind of alchemic process.

DB: Meaning of writing comes through syntax and context more than the physical. [..] Maybe it does not matter so much for the reader whether it is actually written by hand or written on a word processor – that makes a difference to the person who is writing.

DB: Is there a difference when you are physically constructing a robot and when you got parts?  Or, when you are actually doing a design for a robot? I am used, as an architect, to be one step removed from any kind of real construction anyway.

RM: By industrial revolution people used to make everything by hand. [..] Today many things are made in an industrial way but through robots. There is less and less skills. [..] In art – in the past – one used to make colours by hand – now everything is going through the factory. Acrylic is made like plastic bags. The past knowledge about how to make [art] materials by hand is nearly forgotten. [..] It is much easier to create but some things are always missing – and that is our creative and spiritual side.

DB: I think, in some ways, for people who are traditionally already removed from making things, like architects [..] there is a potential that maybe this will give you more control. [The future] will essentially give a possibility to make a building like you make a model. [..] In some ways you will be less limited then now because it will be you and one medium as opposed to you and a whole series of processes.

DB: We are tool making and using species. And if we don’t have a capacity to make tools of some sort whatever the medium is – we lose some of our purpose. People need to feel that they are actually contributing something to the world. And the basic way of doing it is to make something: there is something in the world that wasn’t there before.

RM: In the beginning art was made to serve magic and religious purposes. Even today art is a mirror of our social and ideological ideas we have. [..] Art has different branches and targets. [..] Popular art is serving masses – it is more mass media than it was in the past, but still – it’s a mirror of the human condition.

 

Full Recording:

 

The “Labour of Technology” discussion was looking at the role of “post-fordism” in connection with information technologies, communication systems and data. Discussion partners: architect and Senior Lecturer of the School of Architecture and the Built Environment at Deakin University Dr. Mirjana Lozanovska (ML); artist and Lecturer in Art and Performance at Deakin University Dr. Anne Wilson (AW), and Ian Priddle (IP), the founder of Codeacious, a software company based in Geelong. Moderator: Telematic Cafe curator Marita Batna (MB).

ML: Post-fordism is often described as this fluid thing of production and consumption. [..] How can you have general public? [..] The question of who is the producer and who is the public is erased theoretically but I would contest that to an extent. [..] It becomes a transnational way of understanding production but [..] there is still labour production of objects.

ML: The idea that the line between production and consumption is blurred – is interesting on one hand. [..] Obviously, when those things are blurred, it is not “products.” [..] So, what is then produced, and what is being consumed? I think those details will become important for us to get into a discussion that is below conventional understanding of contemporary work. [..] One of the things that might be produced is new social networks, new digital networks, new ideas of what, in fact, is social – what is friendship. [..] Our friendships that are manufactured due to kinds of interactions and interfaces that people have in social media – what do these friendships mean?

IP: Governments providing data they have and making it freely available is extremely beneficial. [..] If I present to you all the rainfall across entire country and I also say – here is this other set of data – all the traffic lights [..] you might go: “I know how to combine those two things!” to come up with something interesting and useful.

IP: I encourage you to go to http://www.data.gov.au/ – you can see huge variety of data that is currently available. Unfortunately, it is not live, they are data sets but you just get ideas by seeking all the things that you could become aware of.

IP: In the case of public services [..] – sharing that data is incredible. [..] It is definitely developing. I am glad to say that Geelong has one of the highest number of open data sets for a local council, I think, in Australia. So, Geelong is doing a really good job. There is a shift towards making more data open. Then, the next phase will be making that data more live and more accessible. I think that is an area we need to explore.

AW: As I understand that quote [Sean Cubitt claimed that technologies are symbolically inhabited by ancestors and their knowledge but it is invisible to us – MB] our ancestors are inhabiting data through knowledge, through distillation of facts and knowledge that comes through data. [..] Data that is available to us now, in whatever form, has come about through other knowledges and other forms of media in the past. [..] It ended up today as ways of reading information. [..] Pixels and particles are quite different. Particles are in chemical photography and pixels are in digital photography. And that is a different reading of light. [..] One relies upon mathematical formula and one relies upon inherent nature of quantum physics and how light travels. [..] So one appears to be more organic, but one appears to be a distillation down. [..] There is a kind of disconnect, but obviously information is important. [..] I see it as a limitation – that distillation down.

ML: If you look at some of the works done here, for example, Sarah Duyshart’s work: she took the sounds of the raw data that were recorded during the workshops with Macedonian community. To take that and feed it into the program that identified just the base sound [..] – it turns this social chatter into [..] a kind of bodily biological life force. [..] I think what Sarah did was primordial and futuristic.

IP: We recently did an installation that required VR hardware. We didn’t have VR experience but we could combine this with sound, light and movement to create an experience for people. Because we have focused on understanding those mediums – we knew those boundaries and created art “of sorts” within those boundaries. Because all of this stuff is so new it requires a lot of time and effort and, in particular, digital skills to understand what you can and cannot work with. [..] As technology evolves we will be able to play with it more.

ML: What is the possibility of experimentation? The experimentation requires preparatory work of labour in order for it to be a real experiment otherwise it is just immersive pleasure.

IP: With the emergence of maker spaces you can join other people who have certain knowledge (these are treated as public spaces) – you can play with different things. Then, people who are interested in that will be able to create, but I guess: will they put in the labour and efforts to go further?

AW: In creative practice, I have noticed, technology is the second thing, [..] you have idea and then technology [..] this is how you learn. And this is one way of learning technology.

Full Recording:

***

Advertisements

Documentation and Wrap-up of Telematic Cafe: On Air (6 May 2016)

Telematic Cafe: On Air,  6 May 2016 as part of Geelong After Dark (GAD). View photo-documentation on Flickr – Telematic Cafe GAD.

Thank you to the Geelong After Dark co-producers: City of Greater Geelong and Diversitat and the venue owners/managers.

Key artists and partners of this edition of Telematic Cafe were:

Kazuhiro Goshima (Tokyo, JPN)
Michael Morgan (Batesford, AUS)
Stephanie Andrews, John McCormick, Jordan Vincent and Motion.Lab (Deakin University, Melbourne, AUS)
THE PULSE 94.7FM (Geelong, AUS)
Geelong Amateur Radio Club (Geelong, AUS)

Curator: Marita Batna (Melbourne/Geelong, AUS)

20160506_182153

DSC_0885-1

Telematic Cafe: On Air welcomed 400 visitors during the four-hour event (6pm to 10pm).

For two hours from 6 to 8pm, Beav’s Bar became a ground for a collective communication space broadcast live on THE PULSE 94.7FM community radio. Referring to Bertolt Brecht’s proposition of “radio as an apparatus of communication”, the project Radio Whispers (Bhagavad-Gita) delivered a loop of communication based on interpretation of Bhagavad-Gita verses. Participants picked verses through a blind draw. These verses were delivered on screen as a computer feedback generated though voice-to-text software. Participants were reading (interpreting) the generated verses live on radio. This live content was re-broadcast from FM onto AM band and provided for simultaneous listening via crystal radios. Readings were combined with layers of world music in various national languages with rap rhythms and chants among other styles. Audio recording of the broadcast (courtesy of THE PULSE 94.7FM):

Thoughts from one of participants: “Such a pleasure to read, to observe, to listen, to admire and to converse… I have a longing for more…”

Thank you goes to team members Terry Guida, Stephen Juhasz, Matt Gogarty, Darby Hewitt, Toki Babai, and Cal Lee for smooth running of Radio Whispers (Bhagavad-Gita)! Special thanks to THE PULSE 94.7FM coordinator Leo Renkin for making this project happen.

In the cosy back room of Telematic Cafe (Beav’s Bar) the participants could put the 3D glasses on and traverse the night-time Tokyo through the immersive and poetic world of Shadowland – award-winning work produced by Kazuhiro Goshima with single 2D camera. Thank you to Ray Luke for providing screening equipment for this work.

The other side of Telematic Cafe: On Air was occupying the empty shop across Little Malop street, opposite Beav’s Bar. In here, the GAD participants encountered Michael Morgan’s installation Symbiotic Illusion – created for the GAD night. This elaborated structure referred to the illusion of symbiosis and contrived human ideals, and was composed of glass fish tanks containing illuminated figures of heads (in ice and plastic), and water environments featuring salon-like scenography made of ceramic figurines.

Part of the room, behind the large shop windows, was an exciting pop-up off-site for Deakin Motion.Lab. Here, the GAD participants experienced a great night of “dancing a duet” with VR / artificially intelligent partner – trying out and contributing to Duet created by Motion.Lab’s artists-researchers. For the duration of four hours artist Stephanie Andrews was engaged in continuous talk and answering of questions about the function of Duet, whilst participants immersed in the work.  She was joined by fellow artist John McCormick.

What a night! Telematic Cafe: On Air was extraordinary and gained a lot of amazing response and incredible level of participation! Thank you to all who joined in and see you in the next event!

 

Telematic Café: On Air – Friday Night 6 May 2016, 6-10 pm

TelematicCafe-Image-Michael-Morgan-Symbiotic-Illusion-Detail

The next edition of Telematic Cafe is here – and will form a part of Geelong After Dark, 6pm to 10pm, Friday 6 May 2016. Addressing this year’s festival theme – “air” – Telematic Café draws on the nature of air as it signifies immateriality and space, and is titled Telematic Café: On Air. “Telematic communication models” are therefore relating to the capacity of constructing new spaces, highlighting the merge of separate worlds and modes of materiality and providing expanded/new areas for communication, experience and existence.

In the framework of Geelong’s own Night Arts festival – Telematic Cafe will open up for the night to temporarily occupy and transform two very different but close locations to create site(s) that will make the art experience a tangible /physical activity which – metaphorically – compares to the process of having a coffee within the social environment of cafe.

20160421_140945

Telematic Cafe: On Air is composed to offer four projects across two locations.

LOCATION 1: BEAVS BAR (Little Malop street, Geelong). This people’s favourite eclectic lounge bar will host:

Kazuhiro Goshima (JP). SHADOWLAND. Through a poetic narrative this stereoscopic (3D) film explores the creation of 3D vision with DSLR camera. The work brought the artist the Award of Distinction at Ars Electronica 2014.  

Radio Whispers (Bhagavad-Gita) with THE PULSE 94.7FM (community radio) and Geelong Amateur Radio Club.  A collaboration on radio waves and a chance to explore the construction of radio as the apparatus of communication – from live production and broadcast to listening.

LOCATION 2: VACANT SHOP (Cnr Little Malop Street and James Street). This rustic place will focus on the creation of new realities featuring two artist projects:

Stephanie Andrews, John McCormick, Jordan Vincent and Deakin Motion.Lab. DUET. Exploring the newest technologies, this virtual reality experience brings you into communication relationships, via movement, with your artificially intelligent partner.

Michael Morgan. SYMBIOTIC ILLUSION. A monumental installation reflecting the material qualities – solid, liquid, to air-like and a statement of the metaphor about illusionary nature of coexistence and the contradiction contained in human-related conflicts.

Telematic Cafe: On Air is curated by Marita Batna.

Top Image: Michael Morgan. Symbiotic Illusion (detail), 2016.